36 Via Francigena

  • Foreign path:
  • Canterbury
  • Gran San Bernardo
  • Gran S. Bernardo
    21
  • Echevennoz
  • Aosta 
  • Châtillon 
  • Verrès
    21
  • Pont St. Martin 
  • Ivrea 
  • Viveron
  • Santhià
  • Vercelli
  • Robbio 
  • Mortara
  • Garlasco 
  • Pavia
    8
  • Santa Cristina 
  • Orio Litta 
  • Piacenza 
  • Fiorenzuola
  • Fidenza
  • Fornovo 
  • Cassio
  • Passo della Cisa
  • Pontremoli 
    8
  • Aulla
    34
  • Sarzana 
  • Massa
  • Camaiore 
  • Lucca
  • Altopascio 
  • San Miniato 
    10 34
  • Gambassi Terme
    34
  • San Gimignano
    34
  • Monteriggioni 
    34
  • Siena  
  • Ponte d'Arbia
  • San Quirico 
  • Radicofani 
  • Acquapendente 
  • Bolsena 
  • Montefiascone 
    18
  • Viterbo 
    18
  • Vetralla 
    18
  • Sutri
    18
  • Campagnano di Roma 
    18 32
  • La Storta
    18 32
  • Roma
    13 18 29 32 35
  • Variant:
  • San Quirico
  • Abbadia San Salvatore
  • Acquapendente
  • Variant:
  • Radicofani
  • Proceno
  • Acquapendente 

From Canterbury to Rome, an international 'Culture Route of the Council of Europe'

Hide/Show elements on map

Via Francigena - Logo
Official Logo

The Francigena Way is a long international itinerary that has been awarded recognition as a Culture Route of the Council of Europe. Starting in Canterbury for Rome, the Way crosses four countries: England, France, Switzerland and Italy, touching thirteen European regions.

Along the thousand kilometres, from the Passo del Gran San Bernardo to Rome, there are innumerable places to visit but it is designed to be as enjoyable as possible: easy trails, mule tracks, country roads and by-road traverse the  ancient ways of Italy.

Via Francigena - Gothic building, Piacenza - AEVF
Gothic building, Piacenza

The Via Francigena (or ‘the road from France’) became important when, after Longobard rule, the Franks turned the road into the main link between northern and southern Europe. An early authoritative description comes from the diary of the Archbishop of Canterbury before the year 1000, when he took note of all the details of the route while returning to England Including the eighty overnight stops.

Via Francigena - Casola Castle, Terenzo - AEVF
Casola Castle, Terenzo

The Via Francigena (or ‘the road from France‘) became important when, after Longobard rule, the Franks turned the road into the main link between northern and southern Europe. An early authoritative description comes from the diary of the Archbishop of Canterbury before the year 1000, when he took note of all the details of the route while returning to England Including the eighty overnight stops.

With the rise of pilgrimage in the year 1000, the Francigena became the main connection between Jerusalem, Rome and Santiago. North European pilgrims travelled the road to Rome and the Apulian ports and thereafter to the Holy Land. Whereas Italian pilgrims going to Santiago de Compostela used it to reach the main routes to Spain.

Via Francigena - Taro Bridge, Fornovo - AEVF
Taro Bridge, Fornovo

As of April 2017, the credentials issued by the European Association of the Vie Francigene grants a number of additional benefits to pilgrims:

  • discounted rates for traveling with Trenitalia;
  • reductions in the numerous of restaurants and bars along the way;
  • special price for those who purchase Credentials along with the Official Guide;
  • reduced postage for those who buy the credentials online from the website
1Cammino