27 Magna Via Francigena

  • Palermo
  • Santa Cristina Gela
  • Corleone
  • Prizzi
  • Castronovo di Sicilia
  • Cammarata/San Giovanni Gemini
  • Sutera
  • Recalmutto/Grotte
  • Joppolo Giancaxio
  • Agrigento
  • Variant:
  • Palermo
  • Monreale
  • Santa Cristina Gela
  • Variant:
  • Palermo
  • Piana degli Albanesi
  • Santa Cristina Gela

An ancient milestone testifies to the existence of a route between Palermo and Agrigento as early as Roman times. However, the name goes back to the Norman - Swabian period

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Joining Palermo and Agrigento, the Magna Via Francigena cannot be defined as a single road, but a series of different routes. A link between the two cities has existed since Roman times, as revealed by the discovery of an old milestone in Corleone showing the distances between the rest stops. Documents and diplomas dating back to the Norman – Swabian period gave it a name. Magna, to indicate it’s great length, and the term Francigena probably refers to the French origins of the knights travelling here during the Middle Ages.

A journey through history, culture, landscapes and spirituality. Leaving from the Cathedral of Palermo, the way leads to the Cathedral of Monreale and the Piana degli Albanesi. Crossing the expanses of wheat fields towards Corleone, you arrive at the Nature Reserve of Monte Carcaci, and thereafter Castronovo di Sicilia, the geographical centre of the Magna Via.

The final stages pass by the mining village of Comitini and Aragona, and, after the last stretch of countryside, reach the fortress of Agrigento, where the Atenea Rupe overlooks the Mediterranean and the Valley of the Temples.

1Cammino